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AND WE’RE OFF! We have started with the first in our 8 part series of webinars

AND WE’RE OFF! We have started with the first in our 8 part series of webinars

We had our first in an 8 part series of FREE webinars on 30 September 2020. It was hosted by Dr Cobus Raath and covered the history and evolution of potent opioids as they are used for wildlife immobilization today.

For the replay of the webinar click here

To register for the rest of the webinars in the series, go to http://bit.ly/wildlifewebinars

Richter Pharma goes wild!

Richter Pharma goes wild!

Wildlife Pharmaceuticals is proud to be partnering with Richter Pharma to provide European veterinarians with the same quality products that our South African veterinarians have come to know us for. We were featured in their in-house magazine this month and look forward to a long and successful relationship with this well-known and respected pharmaceutical company.

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KoeGer Science – adapting to our new changing environment

KoeGer Science – adapting to our new changing environment

KoerGer Science, a division of Wildlife Pharmaceuticals, is an essential service provider, producing active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) for the veterinary industry. Faced with global COVID-19 restrictions, our team has certainly needed to rapidly adapt to the ever-changing environment we find ourselves in. With a focus on maintaining the quality of our products while ensuring the safety of our personnel, we have implemented a number of risk mitigating procedures based on thorough daily risk assessments. We have managed to avoid disruptions to our supply chain and hope to keep moving forward in providing our customers with the quality products they have come to expect from us for.

How to keep a sleeping giant on its toes

How to keep a sleeping giant on its toes

Sedating captive elephants can be tricky! Not only is it complicated working with such a large animal when it’s lying down, but it can be stressful for the other elephants housed in the same group to watch as one of their counterparts is darted and brought to the ground.

Herein lies the challenge: how do you sedate an elephant enough to do minor veterinary procedures while still keeping it on its feet? The answer lies in a unique ratio of butorphanol, azaperone and medetomidine. The combination provides good sedation and analgesia without completely immobilizing the elephant….AND the added bonus is that the effects are fully reversible with naltrexone and atipamezole.

We tested the combination on 14 semi-captive elephants at Hoedspruit Elephant Rehabilitation and Development (H.E.R.D.). The elephants were successfully sedated while standing, allowing us to treat their wounds, take blood samples and safely vaccinate them all without any reactions. After 50 minutes, the sedation was fully reversed and in less than 8 minutes, all of the elephants had re-joined the herd.

A special thank you to the Dr Peter Rogers, Ms Adine Roode and the rest of the team at H.E.R.D. for their invaluable assistance. Without them, this study would not have been possible.

The Flying Syringe

The Flying Syringe

Dr Toni Harthoorn was a veterinarian, an environmentalist and the reason we are able to do what we do. He pioneered the development of large-animal tranquilizers and was part of the team that developed etorphine hydrochloride and tested it for the first time to immobilize wildlife. He also helped refine the dart gun as we know it today. His breakthrough work has led to veterinarians worldwide being able to safely capture and transport wild animal and is recorded in his first book: The Flying Syringe. Dr Harthoorn’s animal sanctuary was even the inspiration for the television series Daktari. He died in 2012, at the age of 89. From all of us at Wildlife Pharmaceuticals, we salute you Dr Harthoorn.

The art and science of giraffe immobilization

The art and science of giraffe immobilization

Giraffes have a unique anatomy and physiology, making them one of the most challenging species to safely immobilize. Their large size makes them difficult to handle and their characteristically long neck, if not controlled, can create a danger to itself and the capture team. The chemical immobilization of giraffes dates back to the 1960’s, when increasing doses of succinylcholine was used to paralyze animals. Since then, many advances have been made to refine the drug combinations used and today, giraffes can safely be captured, walked into trailers and transported thanks to the pioneering work of veterinarians in the field. For more on the anaesthesia of this unique species, download this article by renowned vets, Dr Cobus Raath, Dr Mitch Bush and Dr Douw Grobler: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/eca2/f3bf785d005ca0f37be867a06291ab3e7671.pdf?_ga=2.250106950.1197323994.1586853602-417917509.1574238585